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Nothing says summer like a big ‘ol wedge of ice-cold, juicy watermelon. A close second is this refreshing sorbet, which is a snap to prepare and holds up texture-wise in the freezer for a few days (not all sorbets do). The addition of fresh lime juice balances the sweetness of the watermelon, which can be cloying. For an even quicker treat, you can skip the churning part entirely; just pour the sorbet base into popsicle molds and freeze. And for a fancy-schmancy dessert, alternate layers of watermelon and lime or lemon sorbet (store-bought, why not?) and serve with a tuile or coconut cookie. It’s the perfect ending to a hot summer night’s dinner, and a lot less sticky than eating fresh watermelon.

Makes about 1 quart

Ingredients


  • 5 cups (740 grams) seedless watermelon flesh chunks (from about a 5-pound piece of watermelon)
  • 1/3 cup (66 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup (108 grams) light corn syrup
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons (39 grams) freshly squeezed lime juice
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions


  1. Place half of the watermelon chunks, half of the sugar and half of the corn syrup in the jar of a blender and process until completely smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl, then repeat with the remaining watermelon, sugar and corn syrup. Add the lime juice and salt to the watermelon mixture and stir well to combine. Cover the bowl and refrigerate the mixture for at least 4 hours, or overnight, until thoroughly chilled.
  2. Process the chilled mixture in an ice cream machine. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze for at least 3 hours, until firm.

Recommended equipment:


Cuisinart ICE-70 ice cream maker

Midnight Scoop Ergonomic Ice Cream Scooper

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Tish Boylehttps://pastryathome.com
Tish Boyle is the Managing Editor of Pastry Arts Magazine, a food writer and cookbook author with expertise in baking, desserts and chocolate. A graduate of Smith College and La Varenne Ecole de Cuisine, Tish has written several dessert and baking books including Chocolate Passion, Diner Desserts, The Good Cookie, The Cake Book and Flavorful. Co-writing credits include Payard Desserts and the Grand Finales series of books.

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